The only way to make sure people you agree with can speak is to support the rights of people you don't agree with.
— Eleanor Holmes Norton




Reporter: What kind of message do you hope to send with this law suit?

Deb: Well.

Reporter: I mean, you've already lost.

Deb: I've already lost.

Reporter: You've lost the appeal.

Deb: I've lost the appeal.

Reporter: Now you're going to the Supreme Court.

Deb: At this point the . . . (Noise for jack-hammering on the street beside us. Deb is obviously frustrated by the noise and had already asked to move the interview to a quieter place, but the reporter insists on having the image of the courthouse in the background.)

Reporter: Hold on. Oh well. Okay. Sorry. Let's go through this.

Deb: The court has ruled that basically the Constitution and several landmark decisions involving free speech at school are irrelevant. They've said that teachers have no right of free speech, and that means that a teacher can be fired for any little random comment that she makes. And the court has also said that a teacher's speech is a commodity that she sell for a salary to the school which I think is a very dangerous concept, and I don't think we should let that stand because I think free speech is an inalienable right, and I don't think teachers should lose their rights as a citizen whenever they go to work.